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jackboots

The Jack-Booted Thugs

America’s new theme song?

The jack-booted thugs one day
Will come to your house to say
“Surprise - its time!” then smash down your front door.

They'll smile when they pound your face
Then leave without a trace
The tough jack-booted thugs have done their chore.

It's never a "make believe"
When they'll tell you to pack and leave
Those rough jack-booted thugs will make it so.

They'll rip off the best you have
And tell you you should be glad
They didn't kill your kids so "time to go”.

Life is a gamble
Tween paradise and hell
Yes each moment is precious
For tomorrow... who can tell?
So today take the time to relish your life
For who knows in a moment 
You could be jack booted or knifed!

(Short Interlude)

So watch what you say or do
A misjudgment will call the crew
Each day of caution now forever dull.

They'll come for you day or night
And kick your ass if you fight
Better watch your back there’ll never be a lull
The shadow looms and laughter has been nulled
As the jack boot lifts to crack another skull.

Music, Lyrics, Vocals: Rich Coffey
Recorded at Mistura Productions


Comments:
This little ditty jarringly melds happy-go-lucky music with horrific lyrics. It was written on my train commute way back in March. Sure its a strange juxtaposition—is it merely just a catchy tongue-in-cheek novelty song or scarily prophetic for the times ahead?

Political Satire:
Political cartoons are IMHO often the most powerful way to convey a statement [ example 1 | example 2 ]. Well done political satire—be it visual or aural—has a stinging bite that can linger long after the initial look or listen. From old British drinking songs to the tortured soul of Shostakovich, or from the brilliance of the Beatles to the more cryptic songs of Steely Dan - music has often contained hidden double meanings: identifying and mocking hypocrisy and/or taunting the status quo.

Music Details:
I must admit, Monty Python’s “Always Look on the Bright Side Of Life” was a big influence on the ”flippant” tone of this song and Louis Armstrong’s “What A Wonderful World” kinda filled out the bridge. There’s even more irony in that isn’t there?

D-50: woodwinds